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Sunday, March 17, 2013

science-fairpaperformat

2 Comments

  1. Gather your materials.
    You may wish to grow a seed crystal, a small crystal to weight your string and provide a surface for larger crystals to grow onto. A seed crystal is not necessary as long as you are using a rough string or yarn.
    Tie the string to a pencil or butter knife. If you have made a seed crystal, tie it to the bottom of the string. Set the pencil or knife across the top of the glass jar and make sure that the string will hang into the jar without touching its sides or bottom. However, you want the string to hang nearly to the bottom. Adjust the length of the string, if necessary.
    Boil the water. If you boil your water in the microwave, be very careful removing it to avoid getting splashed!
    Stir in the sugar, a teaspoonful at a time. Keep adding sugar until it starts to accumulate at the bottom of the container and won’t dissolve even with more stirring. This means your sugar solution is saturated. If you don’t use a saturated solution, then your crystals won’t grow quickly. On the other hand, if you add too much sugar, new crystals will grow on the undissolved sugar and not on your string.
    If you want colored crystals, stir in a few drops of food coloring.
    Pour your solution into the clear glass jar. If you have undissolved sugar at the bottom of your container, avoid getting it in the jar.
    Place the pencil over the jar and allow the string to dangle into the liquid.
    Set the jar somewhere where it can remain undisturbed. If you like, you can set a coffee filter or paper towel over the jar to prevent dust from falling into the jar.
    Check on your crystals after a day. You should be able to see the beginnings of crystal growth on the string or seed crytal.

    What You Need

    1 cup water
    3 cups table sugar (sucrose)
    clean glass jar
    pencil or butter knife
    string
    pan or bowl for boiling water and making solution
    spoon or stirring rod

  2. Anonymous says:

    Robert Turner
    3/30/13 Science Fair

    Foam-Chemistry

    Table of Contents
    Table of Contents Page 2
    Introduction Page 3
    Problem/Question (Purpose) 4
    Hypothesis Page 4
    Research Page 5
    Materials Page 6
    Procedure Page 6
    Data/Observation (Results) Page 7
    Conclusion Page7
    Acknowledgements Page 8
    Bibliography Page 8
    Pictures page 9,10,11,12

    The reason I picked this topic is because I wanted to see if the foam would blow up on my dad’s kitchen floor, or counter top. I wanted to answer what,when,how,and who. I wanted to explore how foam multiplied. It seemed like it was calling to me. The pictures also brought me in. It was so foamy and thick.

    Foam-chemistry
    The purpose of this experiment was Does the amount of yeast affect the amount of foam produced?
    The hypothesis was, if I put 1 packet of yeast in a bottle and one and a half packets in the other then the 1 ½ packet of yeast will produce more than the full packet.

    Foam is made up of oxygen. The yeast in the experiment acts as catalysts and help complex reactions occur. In order for that to happen, the reactants must collide with enough energy so that the existing bonds will be broken and new bonds can form. Basically in order for a chemical reaction to occur you have to break the ties with the original so you can make something different come out of the experiment

    Materials
    1. 2 16 ounce plastic soda bottle
    2. ½ cup of 20 volume hydrogen peroxide liquid
    3. 1 ½ packet of dry yeast
    4. 1 packet of dry yeast
    5. 3 tablespoons of warm water
    6. Liquid dish washing soap
    7. Food coloring
    8. Small cup
    9. Safety goggles
    Procedure
    1. Put on your goggles
    2. Ask an adult to pour a half cup of the hydrogen peroxide into the bottle.
    3. Add 1tablespoon of liquid dish soap into the bottle and swish the bottle around a bit to mix it.
    4. In a separate small cup, combine the warm water and the 1packet of yeast together for about 30 seconds.
    5. Pour the yeast water mixture into the first bottle.
    2nd bottle
    6. Ask an adult to pour a half cup of the hydrogen peroxide into the 2nd bottle.
    7. Add 1tablespoon of liquid dish soap into the bottle and swish the bottle around a bit to mix it.
    8. In a separate small cup, combine the warm water and the 1 ½ packet of yeast together for about 30 seconds.
    9. Pour the yeast water mixture into the 2nd bottle.
    10. Watch what happens!

    Data/ Observations
    TEST TUBE 1 SIMILAR TEST TUBE 2
    Test tube 1 had less foam than test tube 2. As soon as I put the yeast in the hydrogen peroxide mixed with the food coloring, foam was created. Test tube 2 had more foam than test tube 1.
    Test tube 1 was faster than test tube 2. As time went by the foam decreased. Test tube 2 was slower than test tube 1
    Test tube 1 had less foam than test tube 2. In the beginning both was white with a little color and thick. Test tube 2 had more foam than test tube1
    Test tube 1 took 2 min. to stop At the end they both were high color and pure liquid. Test tube 2 took 3 min. to stop
    Both bottles were 16.7
    Conclusion
    Hypothesis-If I put 1 packet of dry yeast inside one bottle and 1 ½ packets in another bottle, then the 1 ½ one will produce more foam. mnjmade out of oxygen. The yeast in the experiment acts as a catalyst and helps complex reactors occur. In order for that to happen the reactors must collide with enough energy, so that new bonds can occur.

    Resources
    • scienceBob.com
    • science experiment: foamy fountain.com
    • The fantastic foam fountain.com

    I want to thank my mom for supporting me, who is not here at the moment. I also want to thank my dad who bought the materials for me. Also my sister who helped me. And Ms.Krecik who assigned the project for us. And friends who supported me. I hope that you liked my paper. Now awe at my pictures.

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